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Fact Sheets: Canada's actions on maternal, newborn, and child health

Afghanistan

National population 32.4 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 1,400 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2008 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Under-five mortality 161 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2008 (Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health, Strategic Plan 2011)
Infant mortality 111 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2008 (Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health, Strategic Plan 2011)

To help Afghanistan strengthen its health services at the community level, address the scarcity of skilled health care workers, particularly women, and improve health services and facilities, Canada is:

  • helping Afghanistan train health care workers with a focus on those working in maternal, newborn, and child health; and
  • expanding the availability of quality health services, particularly in remote and underserviced areas.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Increase the number of health workers from 7.4 per 10,000 people in 2011 to 10.8 in 2015.
  • Increase the percentage of the population with access to primary health care services within two hours' walking distance from 65 percent in 2006 to 75 percent by 2015.

To help reduce the burden of preventable and transmissible diseases, Canada is:

  • treating, preventing, and controlling communicable diseases through the increased use of routine, new, and underused immunization programs.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Ongoing polio vaccination of more than 7.8 million children across Afghanistan.
  • Increased national immunization coverage of children aged 2-23 months who are fully vaccinated (with Penta 3 and measles vaccines) from 33 percent in 2008 to 70 percent by 2015.

To improve nutrition, Canada is working at the community level in Afghanistan to:

  • increase awareness about healthy eating, especially among women and children; and
  • increase access to nutrition-related goods and services.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Reduce the prevalence of chronic malnutrition from 54 percent in 2004 to 47 percent by 2013.
  • Increase the number of mothers who have begun exclusive breastfeeding within the first hour of birth by 30 percent by 2015.

In conjunction with existing country efforts, Canada, with Afghanistan and other partners, is working toward the following goals by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 960 deaths per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 117 deaths per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 85 deaths per 1,000 live births.

Bangladesh

National population 150.5 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 194 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2010 (Bangaldesh Maternal Health Care Survey 2010)
Under-five mortality 65 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2007 (Bangladesh Democratic Health Survey 2007)
Infant mortality 52 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2007 (Bangladesh Democratic Health Survey 2007)
Neonatal mortality 37 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2007 (Bangladesh Democratic Health Survey 2007)

To help Bangladesh scale up and strengthen its health systems at the community level and address the lack of skilled health personnel and the limited and unequal access to health services and supplies, Canada, through the Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, is:

  • increasing the number of skilled community birth attendants and other health workers able to deliver comprehensive and emergency obstetrical care;
  • strengthening weak referral processes and uneven availability of care and services, and scaling up an integrated, comprehensive approach to the delivery of district level services; and
  • providing family planning services, commodities, and essential medicines and vaccines.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Number of trained community-based, skilled birth attendants increased from 6,155 to 13,500.
  • Number of trained midwives increased from 60 to 3,000.
  • 13,500 community health clinics upgraded to functional.
  • 50 percent of upgraded facilities at sub-district level able to provide basic emergency obstetric care services.
  • 70 percent of facilities at district level and below have sufficient inventory of contraceptives to meet the local demand.
  • 75 percent of the essential drug kit (10 drugs) are available in the facilities at the district level.

To reduce illness and disease, Canada is assisting Bangladesh to:

  • provide medicines and supplies for the prevention and treatment of acute respiratory tract infections, diarrheal diseases, especially for mothers and children; and
  • increase the rate of childhood immunization.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 50 percent of children (0-59 months) with pneumonia have received antibiotics.
  • 90 percent of children (12 months and under) have received measles immunization.

To improve nutrition, Canada, by working through the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement, will help increase access to proper nutrition for mothers and children by:

  • improving nutrition through the promotion of nutritious foods and good infant and child feeding practices, including exclusive breastfeeding;
  • providing micronutrient supplements for women and children under five to prevent anemia and vitamin A deficiency; and
  • strengthening government-led efforts and building national capacity to catalyze action on nutrition to improve health and reduce deaths among the most disadvantaged women and children.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 52 percent of children 6-23 months fed using appropriate infant and young-child feeding practices.
  • 50 percent of women exclusively breastfeeding their infants for 6 months.
  • 90 percent of children (6-59 months) receiving vitamin A supplementation.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada and its partners in Bangladesh will work toward the following achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 143 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 48 per 1,000 live births;
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 31 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of neonatal mortality to 21 per 1,000 live births.

Ethiopia

National population 84.7 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 470 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2008 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Under-five mortality 104 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2009 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Infant mortality 68 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Levels and Trends in Child Mortality 2011, UNICEF)

To help Ethiopia improve nutrition, Canada is working through the Muskoka Initiative to address the lack of knowledge about nutrition and appropriate infant and child feeding practices among health extension workers by:

  • training health workers to promote community-based nutrition techniques, including optimal breastfeeding and appropriate, complementary feeding for infants; and
  • expanding access to micronutrients.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Improved nutrition and health of three million children and pregnant and lactating women in 100 food-insecure districts.
  • 4,000 health extension workers and 8,000 volunteer community health workers trained and equipped to deliver preventative community-based nutrition activities.
  • 4,000 health extension workers trained and equipped to provide screening and treatment for children aged 6 months to 5 years suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

To help reduce chronic malnutrition and improve the limited access to proper nutrition for mothers and children, Canada, through the Muskoka Initiative and the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement, is working to:

  • improve nutrition of women and children by promoting healthy nutrition through regular community dialogue and community initiatives;
  • increase the frequency of monitoring of pregnancies and child growth from semi-annual to quarterly; and
  • expand the essential health and nutrition package, including regular micronutrient supplementation, deworming, and screening for acute malnutrition.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Pregnant and lactating women and their children attending quarterly community health days and receive vitamin A, iron supplements, and deworming tablets.
  • Increased number of infants 0-6 months in targeted communities exclusively breastfed and infants 6-9 months receiving nutritious and appropriate complementary food.
  • Increased number of severely malnourished children successfully treated in their community.

To address limited access to clean water and sanitation facilities, Canada and its partners in Ethiopia are working to:

  • build and rehabilitate water and sanitation facilities, establish safe water points, and encourage families and communities to improve hygiene practices.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 125,000 people in the targeted communities using safe water sources.
  • 1.5 million people (75 percent of households) have improved sanitation.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada and its partners in Ethiopia will work toward the following achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 267 deaths per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five child mortality to 50 deaths per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of the percentage of children with stunted growth due to malnutrition from 46 percent to 37 percent.

Haiti

National population 10.1 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 300 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2009 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Under-five mortality 86.7 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2008 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Infant mortality 87 deaths per 1,000 live births (World Health Statistics, 2011)

To help Haiti strengthen its health services at the community level-including rebuilding medical care facilities destroyed in the 2010 earthquake-Canada is working to increase the number of health professionals, services, clinics, and hospitals by:

  • training nurses and midwives, building a national school of midwifery in Haiti, and developing a midwifery curriculum;
  • adding gynecology, obstetric, and pediatric wings to the planned rebuilding and relocation of the Gonaives hospital; and
  • increasing the availability of free health care for displaced persons and children under five.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Increase the percentage of pregnant women cared for and attended to during deliveries by trained medical personnel in adequately equipped health facilities from the current 25 percent to 35 percent by 2015.
  • More than 4,000 health professionals (including at least 150 nurse-midwives) to be trained by 2015.
  • Increase the availability of free health care from 63 institutions to 90 and establish, for each of the 90, three primary-care-level satellite facilities offering free health care.
  • Increase the total number of women receiving free health care while giving birth, from 60,000 deliveries in 2011 to more than 90,000 by 2015.

To help reduce the increased risk of communicable diseases and malnutrition for vulnerable and affected populations, particularly for women and children under five:

  • Support community-level programs for immunization, hygiene, and curative care, including acute malnutrition and infections.

In conjunction with existing country efforts, Canada, with Haiti and other partners, is working toward the following health achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of the maternal mortality rate to 250 per 100,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of the under-five mortality rate to 50 per 1,000 live births.

Malawi

National population 15.4 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 510 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2008 (World Bank Indicators 2008)
Under-five mortality 92 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (World Bank Indicators 2010)
Infant mortality 58 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (World Bank Indicators 2010)

To help Malawi improve nutrition for mothers and children, Canada is helping to:

  • promote optimal infant and young child feeding practices at the district level;
  • provide training to district and community level workers on early recognition and treatment of malnutrition; improve access to preventative health care and treatment of malnutrition;
  • promote community health practices that will help sustain nutrition outcomes; and
  • expand access to micronutrients.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Reduce proportion of children with low birth weight from 14 percent to 10 percent.
  • Reduce prevalence of stunted growth in children under five from 46 percent to 40 percent.
  • Reduce anemia in pregnant women from 47 percent to 35 percent.
  • Increased ability of district and community-level workers to promote nutrition education.
  • Improved infant and young child feeding practices (exclusive breastfeeding) at the community level.
  • Improved ability of male and female caregivers to prepare nutritious and micronutrient-rich foods.
  • Improved access to malnutrition-prevention interventions, from supplementary to complementary feeding and improved agricultural practices, at the community level.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada, with Malawi and other partners, will work toward the following achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 155 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 78 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 44 per 1,000 live births.

Mali

National population 15.8 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 464 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2006 (Mali's 2006 Enquête démographique et de santé)
Under-five mortality 191 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2006 (Mali's 2006 Enquête démographique et de santé)
Infant mortality 96 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2006 (Mali's 2006 Enquête démographique et de santé)

To help Mali strengthen its health services at the community level and address the lack of skilled health personnel and the limited access to quality health services and supplies in rural areas, Canada, is helping to:

  • improve service delivery at the local level by training more health workers and by increasing access to adequately equipped local health centres.

Anticipated results by 2016

  • The percentage of women whose delivery is assisted by qualified staff increased from 42 percent in 2007 to 60 percent in 2016.
  • Increase in the recruitment, training, and retention of skilled health professionals-including midwives, obstetrical nurses, and doctors-will increase. The goal is to train 8,300 health professionals and 800 specialists by 2015.
  • The number of community health centres increased from 1,013 in 2009 to 1,300 in 2016.

To help reduce the burden of disease and the high rates of malaria and childhood illnesses, Canada is working to:

  • support the provision of medicines, vaccines, and treatments needed to prevent and cure the prevalent diseases that are the main causes of maternal and child mortality.

Anticipated results by 2016

  • By 2016, 65 percent of children will be fully immunized at 18 months of age compared with just 48 percent in 2006.
  • Access to free malaria treatment for pregnant women and children increased from 40 percent in 2009 to at least 80 percent by 2015.

To improve nutrition, Canada is working, through the Muskoka Initiative and the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement, to increase access to proper nutrition for mothers and children by:

  • improving access to healthy and nutritious food and micronutrients; and
  • promoting good nutrition for mothers and improving strategies to detect and treat malnutrition.

Anticipated results by 2016

  • The percentage of exclusively breastfed children, aged 0-6 months, increased from 37 percent in 2006 to 65 percent in 2016.
  • The percentage of underweight children, aged under five, reduced from 32 percent in 2006 to less than 15 percent in 2015.

In the region of Kayes, Mali, Canada is working to achieve the following by 2016:

  • some 253,170 undernourished women and children receiving food assistance;
  • nutritious supplementary food delivered to an additional 12,325 nursing and pregnant women;
  • 3,520 tonnes of basic foodstuffs distributed, including micronutrient-enriched flour, millet, beans and vegetable oil;
  • 238 health workers and 400 women's group and liaison workers trained in how to detect and treat malnutrition cases; and
  • some 65,000 children, aged 6-59 months and suffering from malnutrition, will have received treatment.

Canada will work with Mali and other partners, in conjunction with the existing country plans, toward achieving the following by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 144 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 79 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 41 per 1,000 live births.

Mozambique

National population 23.9 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 500 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2007 (2007 Mozambique National Census)
Under-five mortality 92 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (World Bank Indicators 2010)
Infant mortality 87 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (World Bank Indicators 2010)

Through the Muskoka Initiative, Canada is helping Mozambique to strengthen health services at the community level by addressing challenges such as the lack of skilled health personnel, the limited and unequal access to services and supplies, and the poor overall health infrastructure by:

  • increasing the number of skilled health workers at all levels, especially in rural areas, and training them in areas such as prenatal and postnatal care, safe delivery, and emergency obstetrics;
  • building and refurbishing health facilities, as well as water and electricity supplies; and
  • increasing the availability of critical medicines and equipment including the provision of vaccines.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • Increase in the ratio of health units offering basic emergency obstetric care from 1.4 to 3.8 health units per 500,000 people.
  • Increase in the number of trained health workers able to provide maternal and child health services from 61 to 69 per 100,000 people.
  • 17-percent increase in the number of women delivering in health institutions.
  • 36-percent increase in the number of children under one who have full immunizations.

To help reduce the burden of illness and disease and tackle high rates of malaria and HIV, Canada is working to:

  • improve access to services that prevent motherto-child HIV transmission;
  • increase access to pediatric treatment for HIV;
  • treat more pregnant women for malaria; and
  • provide more insecticide-treated bed nets.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 11-percent increase in the number of women receiving at least two doses of preventative malaria treatment during prenatal visits.
  • 77-percent increase in the number of women receiving an insecticide-treated bed net during prenatal visits.
  • More than 38,000 children will benefit from pediatric antiretrovirals (ARVs).
  • More than 94,000 HIV-positive women will receive ARVs to prevent maternal-to-child transmission.

To increase access to proper nutrition for mothers and children, Canada, through the Muskoka Initiative and the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement, is helping to:

  • promote exclusive breastfeeding of children under six months;
  • expand and improve micronutrient and deworming programs; and
  • establish more nutritional rehabilitation centres to treat acute malnutrition.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • More than 3.5 million children will be reached with vitamin A supplementation and deworming through a national campaign.
  • At least 40 nutritional rehabilitation centres will be operational across the country.
  • Reduce the percentage of children under five with stunting from 23.7 percent (2003) to 17 percent in 2015.
  • Reduce the institutional mortality rate for severe malnutrition from 15 percent (2005) to four percent in 2014.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada, with Mozambique and other partners, will work toward the following achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 250 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 67 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 108 per 1,000 live births.

Nigeria

National population 162.5 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 840 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2008 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Under-five mortality 138 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2009 (United Nations Population Fund, State of the World Population 2011)
Infant mortality 88 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Levels and Trends in Child Mortality 2011)

To help Nigeria strengthen its health services at the community level and address the lack of skilled health personnel and limited access to quality health services and supplies, Canada is:

  • providing technical support to enhance the skills of health workers, including doctors, midwifes and health extension workers, in existing community health structures in 15 of the 36 states in Nigeria; and
  • supporting the procurement and distribution in community health structures of equipment such as newborn resuscitation devices and reproductive health supplies to cover 60 percent of the annual requirements in those 15 states.

Anticipated results in the 15 states by 2015

  • Increase percentage of women having access to at least four antenatal care visits from 45 percent to 80 percent.
  • Increase percentage of births attended by skilled attendants from 39 percent to 85 percent.
  • Increase percentage of mothers and newborns benefiting from a visit by a skilled health worker within 72 hours of delivery from 15 percent to 50 percent.

To help reduce the burden of disease and the high incidence of malaria and HIV, Canada is:

  • providing more insecticide-treated bed nets and medicines; and
  • providing access to HIV rapid tests and early infant diagnosis kits to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

Anticipated results in the 15 states by 2015

  • Increase the proportion of children under-five sleeping under insecticide-treated bed nets from 5.5 percent to 80 percent.
  • Increase the proportion of women and men with a comprehensive knowledge of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV from 50 percent to 100 percent.

To improve nutrition, Canada is:

  • promoting better nutrition and infant feeding practices.

Anticipated results in the 15 states by 2015

  • An increase in the number of infants (0-5 months) who are fed exclusively with breast milk from 13 percent to 80 percent.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada, with Nigeria and other partners, will work toward the following achievements in the 15 states by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 176 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 63 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 30 per 1,000 live births.

South Sudan

National population 8-10 million est., 2008 (Based on a sample survey in 2008 called the 5th Sudan Population and Housing Census done by the Government of South Sudan's statistical agency, the South Sudan Centre for Census Statistics and Evaluation.)
Maternal mortality 2,054 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2006 (Government of Sudan's 2006 Sudan Household Health Survey—most recent figure; maternal mortality was not measured in the Government of South Sudan's 2010 South Sudan Household Health Survey.)
Under-five mortality 106 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Government of South Sudan's 2010 South Sudan Household Health Survey.)
Infant mortality 84 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Government of South Sudan's 2010 South Sudan Household Health Survey.)

South Sudan has very limited access to basic and emergency obstetrics, health services, and family planning. It also suffers a severe lack of skilled health workers, particularly trained midwives. Through the Muskoka Initiative, Canada will help South Sudan strengthen its health systems by:

  • improving access to essential primary health care services, including emergency obstetric care and immunization.

Anticipated results

  • Provide emergency obstetric services to more than 150,000 mothers and newborns.
  • Train 210 hospital personnel to provide 24-hour comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care at eight hospitals in South Sudan.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada, with partners in South Sudan, will work toward the following achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 1,643 per 100,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 59 per 1,000 live births.

Tanzania

National population 46.2 million, 2011 (The United Nations Development Programme, Human Development Report 2011)
Maternal mortality 454 deaths per 100,000 live births, 2010 (Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 2010)
Under-five mortality 81 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 2010)
Infant mortality 51 deaths per 1,000 live births, 2010 (Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 2010)

To help Tanzania strengthen its health services at the community level and address the lack of skilled health personnel and limited access to health services and supplies, Canada, through the Muskoka Initiative, is:

  • increasing pre-service training for health workers;
  • aiding in the recruitment, retention, and training programs for doctors, nurses, and midwives at the community level;
  • increasing access to medicines, medical supplies, and family planning at the district level;
  • improving access to maternal, newborn, and child health services at the district level, particularly in underserved areas, through training, and construction and rehabilitation of health facilities; and
  • improving referral systems, including communication and transportation.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • More than six million women will have benefited from antenatal care and delivery services.
  • More than 40,000 new health workers hired and trained, with 4,000 health workers trained in MNCH service delivery.

To improve nutrition through increasing access to proper nutrition for mothers and children, Canada is:

  • improving nutrition through the promotion of nutritious foods, and good infant and child feeding practices, including exclusive breastfeeding;
  • providing micronutrient supplements for women and children under five to prevent anemia and vitamin A deficiency; and
  • strengthening government-led efforts and building national capacity to scale up and catalyze action on nutrition in order to improve health and reduce deaths among the most disadvantaged women and children.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 40 district and regional officers recruited, trained, and able to provide quality nutrition services.
  • Increased use of exclusive breastfeeding and improved infant feeding practices among pregnant women and mothers in targeted areas.

To reduce high rates of HIV, malaria, and communicable diseases, Canada is assisting Tanzania to:

  • reduce illness and disease by providing medicines and supplies for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and diarrheal diseases, especially for mothers and children; and
  • increase the rate of childhood immunization and train local health workers to better treat and prevent malaria and other illnesses.

Anticipated results by 2015

  • 28 million children and women immunized.
  • More than two million pregnant women reached with malaria prevention.
  • More than 400,000 pregnant women receiving treatment to prevent the mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

In conjunction with existing country plans and efforts, Canada, with Tanzania and other partners, will work toward the following health achievements by 2015:

  • the reduction of maternal mortality to 265 per 100,000 live births;
  • the reduction of under-five mortality to 54 per 1,000 live births;
  • the reduction of infant mortality to 38 per 1,000 live births; and
  • the reduction of neonatal mortality (within 28 days of birth) from 26 to 19 per 1,000 live births.

Multilateral and Global Partners

Canada, through its programming under the Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH), is working with country partners, Canadian civil society organizations, and multilateral and global partners to improve health services to mothers and children across the globe.

Projects and initiatives undertaken under the Muskoka Initiative by Canada and its multilateral and global partners are strengthening health systems at the community level, reducing the burden of illness and disease, and improving nutrition. Eighty percent of Canada's work is directed to sub-Saharan Africa, where the need for Canadian and global assistance is the greatest.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria — The Global Fund is an international financing mechanism that supports developingcountry-led, large-scale prevention, treatment, and care programs for AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Since its inception in 2002, the Global Fund is estimated to have saved 7.7 million lives, most notably through the delivery of HIV treatment to 3.2 million people, the treatment of 8.2 million people for tuberculosis, and the provision of 190 million bed nets to prevent malaria.

In 2010, Canada increased its support to the Global Fund from $450 million to $540 million for the period 2011-2013 to help continue its life-saving work. Of this increase, 46 percent ($41.4 million) will be directed toward achieving Muskoka Initiative goals.

The Micronutrient Initiative — The Canadian-based Micronutrient Initiative delivers essential lifesaving vitamins and minerals to women and children globally. Through Canada's support, the Micronutrient Initiative will:

  • deliver vitamin A to eight million children annually in sub-Saharan African countries and save the lives of 150,000 children by 2015;
  • distribute iron and folic acid supplements to 3.8 million pregnant women, avoiding anemia at term for 500,000 of them;
  • provide community-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition to 200,000 children annually by 2015; and
  • prevent an estimated 17,000 maternal and newborn deaths through integrated health and nutritional interventions.

Through the Muskoka Initiative, Canada has committed $75 million for the period 2011-2015 toward the work of the Micronutrient Initiative. This is in addition to a contribution of $150 million over the period 2009-2014 from ongoing health funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).

The GAVI Alliance — The GAVI Alliance is working to distribute new and underused vaccines. With contributions from Canada and other donors, the GAVI Alliance is working to:

  • immunize 250 million children, thereby preventing 4 million deaths;
  • increase action against the two biggest killers of children—pneumonia and diarrhea—through accelerating the introduction of the necessary vaccines (pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines); and
  • control deadly meningitis epidemics through the introduction of a new vaccine against meningitis A in countries in the sub-Saharan African Meningitis Belt.

Canada is providing $65 million in new funding between 2011 and 2016. Of that total, $50 million originates from the Muskoka Initiative commitment, and the remainder is from ongoing CIDA health funding.

Health 4 Initiative — The Health 4 (H4) Initiative is a collaborative mechanism established by the United Nations Population Fund, UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank to improve coordinated support to national maternal and newborn health programs. In addition to its work with H4 members in the targeted countries, the Government of Canada is supporting the H4 Initiative for joint work among member agencies to scale up quality health services. The project will conduct needs assessments to identify the bottlenecks that prevent improvement of maternal and newborn health in developing countries and recommend ways to reduce the barriers.

The H4 Initiative works with developing-country governments to support the development of performance-based and costed national reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health plans. It addresses the urgent need for skilled health workers and removes financial barriers to health care service access for the poorest people. As part of this initiative, the H4 will tackle the root causes of maternal mortality and morbidity, as well as strengthen monitoring and evaluation systems informing countries and donors of what is working and assessing the impact of their shared effort.

Through CIDA support, the H4 Initiative is being implemented in Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra Leone, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Canada's Muskoka Initiative contribution to the H4 Initiative is $50 million between 2011 and 2016.

Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger (REACH) — Canada's investment is helping reduce child hunger and undernutrition by targeting the 1,000-day window of opportunity (pregnancy to age two), after which the effects of undernutrition are largely irreversible. As part of the Scaling Up Nutrition global movement, REACH is building government and national capacity to effectively increase nutrition interventions, improve health, and reduce mortality rates of the most disadvantaged women and children. It will work through multiple sectors, linking child undernutrition, food security, and health care.

Through Canadian support, there will be a substantial increase in the delivery of basic nutrition services in Bangladesh, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda over the next three years to:

  • avert an estimated two million cases of anemia and associated complications in pregnant women;
  • prevent approximately 225,000 deaths due to severe malnutrition; and
  • over the longer term, reduce stunting in an estimated 2-3.5 million children under the age of three.

REACH is a United Nations interagency team, jointly established by the World Food Programme, UNICEF, WHO, and the Food and Agriculture Organization.

Canada's Muskoka Initiative contribution to REACH is $15 million between 2011 and 2014.

Scaling Up Nutrition — Canada is a key supporter of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement. SUN is a call to action to countries to scale-up their direct nutrition specific investments and work with all interested sectors to better integrate efforts to get nutrition-support to the children and mothers who need it most. SUN supports national governments to put in place the policies and programs that link nutrition across multiple sectors, including agriculture, health, and social protection, to reduce nutrition vulnerability.